How To Change Refrigerator Water Filters?

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How To Change Refrigerator Water Filters?

The most common reason that people give for not changing their refrigerator water filters is that they have “never had a problem with the water” from their current filter. While this may be true, it doesn’t mean you shouldn’t change your filter at least once per year to ensure the best tasting and safest water possible. In this post, we’ll discuss why you should replace your refrigerator’s water filter, some tips on how to do so, and what type of replacement filters are available if you’re looking to upgrade or purchase a new model.

Water is an essential part of everyday life. It’s something we need to drink, cook with, and bathe in. But what many people don’t realize is that the water they use for all these things comes from their home refrigerator. In order to ensure a safe supply of water, it’s important to change the filter on your fridge regularly so that bacteria don’t build up and contaminate your drinking or cooking sources. If you’re not sure how often you should be changing your filter, just check the sticker inside your fridge door!
How To Change Refrigerator Water Filters

What Is A Refrigerator Water Filter?

A refrigerator water filter is a small cartridge-like device that attaches to the water supply of a refrigerator. The filter typically contains a layer of activated charcoal or carbon inside a permeable membrane and/or mesh screen material so it can trap substances in the water. A good fridge filter will remove contaminants from your drinking water, ensuring you have cleaner and safer drinking water from your ice-maker and filtered dispenser.

What Are The Different Types Of Refrigerator Water Filters

  1. In-Line Filters

In-Line filters are usually permanent and have a separate faucet that attaches to the main water line going into the fridge. They typically use activated carbon or reverse osmosis (RO) technology to remove contaminants from your drinking water. These filters are usually one of the most effective because they act on both hot and cold water coming out of the dispenser/ice maker.

  1. Drop Down Filters

 

Drop Down filters are attached to the fridge’s exterior water line that supplies water to your ice-maker. They are different from In-Line filters because they only filter cold water, but provide the same level of filtration.

  1. Slide-Out Filter 

Slide-Out filter pods are typically used to upgrade the existing water dispenser found on side-by-side refrigerator models. They usually attach to one of your fridge’s door shelves and can be removed for easy cleaning. Pods typically use activated carbon or RO technology like In-Line filters, but they also offer pre-softened water options which reduce scaling within your pipes/system over time. Some even come with a separate faucet so you don’t have to uninstall the current water supply coming out of the fridge in order to install it.

  1. Grille Filters

Grille filters are typically placed inside your fridge’s freezer compartment. They can be made using activated carbon like most fridge filters, but they only filter the water that sits on top of your grille (the area where your drinks go). Grille filters are also used to protect the tines/grilles in the ice-maker from hard water build up (mineral deposits), which will ultimately reduce the quality of your cubes and ruin any new ice maker you install after removing it.

  1. Bypass Filters

Bypass filters are usually used to remove contaminants found in municipal water supplies. It consists of a cartridge containing carbon or reverse osmosis resin that uses pressure to push contaminated water through the filter while clean water flows around it, allowing you to access clean drinking water even if your city’s supply is tainted.

  1. Canister Filters

Canister filters are typically used in larger commercial-grade refrigerators, freezers and ice machines. They usually use multiple layers of filter cartridges to remove contaminants like chlorine, taste and odor, sediment (dirt), odors, volatile organic chemicals (VOC’s) and even cysts like cryptosporidium or giardia found in groundwater supplies. There are also whole home canister filters that use similar technology to clean the water coming out of your entire property by removing dirt via a holding tank/reservoir before sending it through carbon post-filtration.

Why Are Refrigerator Water Filters Important?

Refrigerator water filters are important because they can reduce or eliminate contaminants found in your drinking water before it reaches your ice-maker and is consumed. Although fridge manufacturers typically use a high quality filtration system to make fresh cubes/water, the filters that came with them will eventually wear out over time, leaving you with yellowish or brownish ice and tap water that smells funny or doesn’t taste the same. When this happens you’ll know it’s time for a new filter.

How Do Refrigerator Water Filters Work?

Refrigerator water filters typically use one of two types of technology: activated carbon and/or reverse osmosis (RO). Activated Carbon 

Activated carbon is usually made out of coconut shells or coal that’s been burned at extremely high temperatures to create porous granules that attract and absorb contaminants, odors and tastes. The more porous the filter, the larger the surface area needed to trap impurities – which means it can be backwashed, flushed with air or steam sterilized to remove trapped dirt without altering its performance ratings over time. These water filters are usually attached to a cartridge housing with an inlet and outlet spigot for easy replacement and full access by everyone using the fridge.

Reverse osmosis (RO) water filters use a membrane with tiny pores to filter out dirt and other contaminants by pushing contaminated water through the membrane at high pressure while clean water flows around it. This process is 100% effective but can waste as much as 3 gallons of water for every gallon filtered because only pure H2O molecules are allowed through the filter. RO systems also require frequent cartridge changes due to clogging, which happens faster if you have a lot of sediment in your tap/well water supply – which means more wasted-water each time you replace a used cartridge.

What Do Refrigerator Water Filters Filter Out?

Even the best filter cartridges will only filter out organic chemicals like chlorine, pesticides and other harmful substances you can’t see. It won’t remove minerals dissolved in the water (i.e.: calcium, magnesium or sodium) that affect taste or cause scale buildup on your ice-maker (and possibly clog it). If your municipal supply is using heavy amounts of chlorine to disinfect water supplies (which may be unsafe for young children), this can also leave a bad smell and taste behind as well as discolor your cubes/ice – which is why some people opt for an RO system with premium filters to ensure all those chemicals are removed from their drinking supply.

Advantages And Disadvantages Of A Fridge Water Filter

  1. Fridge water filters are usually inexpensive (around $30 to $50) and easy to replace. They can reduce or eliminate odors, chlorine tastes and other contaminants found in regular tap/well water supplies that affect the taste of your drinking supply.
  2. Most refrigerator filters are located under the front crisper drawers behind a cover plate for easy access by everyone using the fridge – which means you’ll always know when it’s time to replace the filter every 6 months or so based on manufacturer guidelines.
  3. Fridge water filters don’t use much countertop space, plus they’re usually long-lasting if you do what’s suggested above about not letting cartridge housing parts sit in dirty water between uses…which is never fun to clean up after.
  4. Fridge water filters that use activated-carbon and/or RO technology to remove impurities and odors tend to be more effective than standard refillable pitchers or spring water dispensers using gravity-fed systems with fewer parts to clean and sanitize the old fashioned way. The cartridges also last longer if you let them drain completely before putting them back in your fridge – usually around 3 months (6 months for RO).
  5. The only disadvantages of a good refrigerator filter is that they should never be used on really hot days when temperatures inside your fridge can reach 60 degrees F, which means you might want to turn off the ice maker until it’s cooler outside or switch to bottled-water (not distilled) to fill your ice-cube tray to reduce risk of bacterial growth.
  6. If you have high levels of calcium, magnesium or other dissolved minerals in water supplies (most often caused by local well water – not municipal), this can leave unsightly mineral stains inside the fridge and on door gaskets that are almost impossible to remove without resorting to bleach or harsh cleaners that wear away at plastic housings over time.
  7. You should never use a refrigerator filter for drinking water because they’re only designed to remove contaminants that might affect taste/odor, which doesn’t include chlorine or bacteria lurking inside tap/well water supplies – no matter how much it’s purified using an RO system with filters. 8. Countertop RO systems cost more to operate when compared to fridge filters, plus you might need to replace expensive membrane cartridges every 6 months or so (depending on usage).
  8. You’ll still need storage containers for drinking water in your refrigerator due to the fact that an RO system doesn’t filter out minerals like calcium and magnesium – unless you opt for a distiller with extra filters, which is another added cost. 10. Both systems don’t really affect taste much, although you may notice a difference using a filter specifically designed for a fridge vs. a countertop model – but only if it’s been installed correctly and there are no leaks at connection points allowing unfiltered water into your drinking supply. 11. Refrigerator filters do not remove bacteria from water supplies or remove anything that causes bad taste/odor – period. 12. It’s a good idea to keep a case of bottled water on hand for emergencies, especially if you’re under-prepared for natural disasters like floods and earthquakes where tap/well water supplies might be contaminated with sewage, chemicals or other harmful bacteria that only safe drinking water can prevent if consumed over time (days to weeks).
  9. You should never use distilled or reverse osmosis (RO) water inside your fridge due to the fact that these systems remove beneficial minerals required by plants and crops grown using regular city/municipal tap/well supplies, which means they aren’t healthy enough to drink either. 14. The biggest disadvantages of refrigerator filters is their cost when used over time, plus they usually require more physical labor changing cartridge housing parts vs. RO units which are usually easy to change out when compared with older refrigerator models using gravity-fed systems with bulky pitchers filled manually at the tap or sink.
  10. The bottom line is that you can save money using a fridge filter over an RO system without sacrificing too many of the benefits each offer for everyday use – just keep track of how often you change filters and order ahead of time if need be so you don’t run out of drinking water before making your next trip to the store.
  11. Of course it’s always best to stock up on bottled water in case elections/legislation changes your tap/well water supply overnight, but there isn’t a need to worry about drinking purified water inside your refrigerator because it’s still considered 100% safe for daily use even if there are levels of dissolved minerals, chemicals or bacteria.
  12. For best results when using a countertop purification system (potentially in combination with an RO system), consider installing a lead-removing filter designed specifically for this purpose – but only if you have confirmed high levels of contaminants like copper and/or lead coming through your tap/well water supply which can cause serious health issues over time (years).
  13. It’s unnecessary to install a plumbing loop outside your house to connect both systems together before reaching the faucet – unless you want to enjoy filtered water from every sink in the house at once.
  14. If you own a commercial building, condominium or apartment complex and want to save money by installing an RO system that feeds into your whole property’s water supply – don’t forget to check with neighbors first to make sure they’re okay with additional expenses associated with changing cartridges and filtering housing parts more often than usual (every 2-3 months).
  15. Reverse Osmosis works well for removing harmful contaminants from tap/well water such as bacteria, chemicals, fluoride and even heavy metals like lead, mercury and arsenic which can cause serious health issues over time if ingested without protection – either bottled or purified drinking water.

How Do You Install A Refrigerator Water Filter?

A refrigerator water filter can be added to most modern models with ease, usually because the included fittings are compatible without additional parts needed for installation – but some older faucets might not have the right sized hole or threads on the interior of the faucet body that matches up correctly to screw in a fridge filter housing.

  1. Most refrigerators come equipped with an attachment kit already included inside the door behind your drinking water/ice cubes reservoir bottles – just pull out each bottle and look for a sticker placed somewhere on top of your original factory installed drinking water dispenser system typically located at the bottom of the fresh food compartment (inside). 
  2. If you don’t see an attached cardboard tag covering up an empty area when looking inside your ice maker storage compartment, check along the inside of your freezer’s top edge located directly behind your drinking water system for a small cardboard tag hanging from a mini-sized string – pull out the plug and set it on the counter.
  3. Remove the plastic cap covering up a standard sized flat screwdriver slot on one end of an included metallic bracket where you’ll attach a refrigerator filter housing unit to your faucet once aligning a white arrow sticker pointing down toward a circular white base plate which is where you’ll install your special tap removal tool (slotted hexagonal shaped). 4. Slide one end of each metal clip into place around both ends of your new inline refrigerator filter housing unit after removing the original factory installed cartridge from inside its compartment. 
  4. Turn your faucet handle on and off a few times to flush out remaining water inside the cartridge before insertion.
  5. Insert the new inline filter housing unit into the attached bracket with arrow sticker facing down towards base plate then remove plastic cap covering up an L-shaped hexagon key that will fit into your tap’s screwdriver slot in order to tighten/loosen each metal clip for easier installation – just be careful not to break them when applying too much pressure against the faucet because even small parts can be costly if broken or lost while installing everything together correctly.

How To Change Refrigerator Water Filters: Step-By-Step

  1. How Often Should You Change The Water Filter In Your Refrigerator?

Every 6-8 months is the standard answer which means it all depends on how much water you use and the quality of your local tap water supply – you’ll usually know when to change or replace your filter cartridges by paying close attention to any unusual smells, tastes, discoloration, bad odors or cloudiness inside your drinking glasses whenever they’re nearly empty (the first sign of trouble). 

Unfortunately, not all refrigerator water filter cartridges are created equal – some of them do a much better job at filtering out harmful contaminants than others so always choose the best possible one for your situation.

  1. Tools Needed For

As mentioned above, you’ll need a flathead screwdriver and adjustable wrench for this job in addition to the replacement cartridge that fits your specific refrigerator model. 

  1. How To Change Refrigerator Water Filters: Step-By-Step

Step1#: Unplug your refrigerator or turn off its circuit breaker to make sure it won’t turn on unexpectedly while you’re working – just be safe, not sorry.

Step2#: Pull out the old cartridge from inside your drinking water system’s storage compartment located behind your fridge door – do this by first removing an arrow-tagged sticker covering up a small flat screwdriver slot located at one end of the metal clip holding your new filter housing unit in place so you can remove both ends of each metal bracket for easier installation/removal later on down the line. 

Step3#: Turn your faucet handle ON to flush out any remaining water inside the cartridge before removal, then insert the special hexagonal into your tap’s screwdriver slot to loosen each metal clip before you pull your new inline filter cartridge out of the bracket for replacement with your old one. 

Step4#: Slide both ends of each metal clip back into place around both ends of the new cartridge, then push it all the way down inside your drinking water system’s storage compartment – be careful not to break anything because even small parts can end up costing big bucks if they’re ever damaged while installing everything together correctly. 

Step5#: Put any plastic cover caps back on after sliding in a fresh new filter cartridge all done, plug in your fridge again and turn its main power switch ON so it will start filling up your ice tray/reservoir bottles with safe clean drinking water again.

How To Change Refrigerator Water Filter At The Bottom Of Your Fridge: Step-By-Step

Step1#: Turn your water filter housing unit counterclockwise with a flathead screwdriver until it’s completely unscrewed from its base – do this by first removing an arrow-tagged sticker covering up a small flat screwdriver slot located at one end of the metal clip holding your new filter housing unit in place so you can remove both ends of each metal bracket for easier installation/removal later on down the line.

Step2#: Pull out the old cartridge from inside your drinking water system’s storage compartment located behind your fridge door – do this by first removing an arrow-tagged sticker covering up a small flat screwdriver slot located at one end of the metal clip holding your new filter housing unit in place so you can remove both ends of each metal bracket for easier installation/removal later on down the line.

Step3#: Insert both ends of your new filter cartridge into place inside your drinking water system’s storage compartment until it locks in place, then turn your faucet handle ON to flush out any remaining water from inside before you purchase a replacement cartridge. 

Step4#: Slide both ends of each metal clip back into place around both ends of your new cartridge, then push it all the way down inside your drinking water system’s storage compartment – be careful not to break anything because even small parts can end up costing big bucks if they’re ever damaged while installing everything together correctly. 

Step5#: Put any plastic cover caps back on after sliding in a fresh new filter cartridge all done, plug in your fridge again and turn its main power switch ON so it will start filling up your ice tray/reservoir bottles with safe clean drinking water again.

How To Change Twist-On Filters: Step-By-Step

Step1#: Twist your old twist-on filter counterclockwise with pliers until it falls off all the way, then take it to your local hardware store or water filtration system supplier before buying a replacement.

Step2#: Screw your replacement twist-on filter clockwise until you feel it lock in place, then turn ON your faucet handle so any air inside can escape – this will make installation easier. 

Step3#: Turn OFF your faucet handle once you’ve finished installing everything correctly, then wait for 5 minutes or so – this allows for proper cartridge priming which prepares itself for water flow by allowing small channels inside to open up properly like they’re supposed to.

Step4#: Turn your faucet handle ON again to make sure everything’s working okay and it’s time for you to start enjoying fresh clean drinking water from inside your home.

How To Change A Push-In Filter: Step-By-Step

Step1#: Turn your faucet handle OFF first to make sure you can easily access your push-in filter cartridge, then take a pair of pliers and remove the small circular rubber tubing located at one end pushing it out from inside should do the trick very quickly. 

Step2#: Keep this small piece aside for about 10 minutes or so before installing a new replacement push-in filter – doing this will allow remaining water droplets trapped inside its channels to drip out completely as small as they are. Step3#: Stick both ends of a replacement push-in filter cartridge down into place until it locks in place, then turn ON your faucet handle so any air inside can escape properly. After turning off your faucet handle, wait for about 5 minutes before flushing out any remaining water droplets and fully priming your filter cartridge so it can start providing you with clean drinking water.

Step4#: Twist off an old push-in replacement filter’s small circular rubber tubing while you’re setting up your new one in its place, then keep this piece aside for about 10 minutes to allow any small drops of water trapped inside to drip out properly – otherwise, they might end up leaking back into your drinking water which is very bad news if that happens. 

Step5#: Twist on a replacement push-in filter’s small circular rubber tubing all the way until it locks into place, then turn ON your faucet again to make sure everything’s working okay before drinking clean water from inside your home.

How To Change An In-Line Filter: Step-By-Step

Step1#: Turn off your faucet handle to make sure you have enough access to your in-line filter cartridge, then take a pair of pliers and slide out the small piece of rubber tubing located at one end that should come out without any problems whatsoever. 

Step2#: Keep this rubber tubing aside for about 10 minutes or so before installing a new replacement in-line filter – doing this will allow remaining water droplets trapped inside its channels to drip out completely as small as they are.

Step3#: Stick both ends of a replacement in-line filter cartridge down into place after letting any residual water drip out properly, then turn ON your faucet handle so any air inside can escape – be careful not to kink your new filter’s tubing as you twist it slowly on to prevent any possible leaks. Step4#: Twist off an old in-line replacement filter’s rubber tubing while you’re setting up your new one in its place, then keep this piece aside for about 10 minutes to allow any small drops of water trapped inside to drip out properly – otherwise they might end up leaking back into your drinking water which is very bad news if that happens. 

Step5#: Twist the replacement in-line filter cartridge on until it locks into place, then turn ON your faucet again just to make sure everything is working okay before drinking clean water from inside your home. 8. How To Change A Reverse Osmosis System’s RO Membrane: Step-By-Step

Tips On Changing Refrigerator Water Filter Cart

First of all, you can’t clean or disinfect your refrigerator’s water filter cartridge – so avoid touching its exterior surfaces at all costs because these are sensitive to dirt and other impurities. 

Each time you change one of your fridge’s water filter cartridges, make sure it sits for about an hour or two before its first use to allow any particles of dust sticking to its internal pores during transportation disappear. Follow these same tips when storing both new and old replacement refrigerator filters in the space provided until next time they’re needed too.

What Happens If You Don’t Change Your Water Filter?

When your tap water is filtered by a carbon filter system, don’t expect it to have the same taste as natural spring water – though it still tastes great with ice cubes. 

If you let it sit for too long without replacing its cartridge, your refrigerator’s water filter might accumulate dirt and other impurities inside its pores that can reduce its filtering ability over time which will eventually cause contaminants to end up in your drinking water again. 

You should also avoid using scented detergents or bleaches when washing any part of your home’s plumbing system including faucet screens because these harsh chemicals can damage even the best types of fridge filters on the market today. In other words, always check what type of replacement filters are compatible with your fridge before cleaning it regularly because not all filters are created equal.

How To Change A Refrigerator Water Filter?

  1. Know Where Your Filter Is Located

Before you can remove and replace your water filter cartridge, you need to locate its housing unit where the old filter is usually located in the front portion of one of the refrigerator’s compartments. 

  1. Tools Needed:

You’ll need a pair of pliers, a screwdriver and either your refrigerator’s owner’s manual or water filter cartridge replacement guide to help you get through this process. 

  1. How To Change A Refrigerator Water Filter: Step-By-Step

Step1#: You need to push both ends of the filter cartridge cap towards each other until you hear a click sound which lets you know it has been unlocked. 

Warning: Please do not attempt this process unless you have a replacement filter cartridge at hand because there is a risk for your refrigerator’s internal components to get damaged otherwise. 

Step2#: Pull the old cap off from its housing unit, then take the water filter cartridge out slowly and carefully before rinsing both items with cold tap water. 

Step3#: Check for any tears, holes or visible damage on either component’s exterior surfaces before installing your new fridge water filter cap – otherwise it might leak once plugged back in later on.

Step4#: Install your new refrigerator water filter cap back into the housing unit and twist it on tightly until its resistance stops you from forcing it any further. 

Step5#: You can now run a small amount of tap water through your filter and discard it to test its flow rate. If the water pressure feels normal, you’re all done! 

How To Care For A Clean Refrigerator Water Filter?

We understand that you are likely to have many questions about how to clean your refrigerator filter, so we’ve put together a list of frequently asked questions that will hopefully help answer some of them. 

The best cleaning method for this type of water filter cartridge is either by using warm tap water and a soft brush or cloth to wipe away any sediment buildup on its exterior surfaces or by soaking it in cold salt-water overnight before rinsing both the unit and its cap thoroughly afterwards with clean tap water because harmful contaminants can build up inside its pores under normal use conditions – which can compromise your health over time.

What Can’t Refrigerator Filters Remove?

 refrigerator water filters are not designed to remove the following substances:

  • Chlorine Odors & Flavors – The chlorine in tap water is only removed if you use cold water and let your filter cartridge soak overnight before rinsing it clean. Warm or hot water will not remove chlorine from your drinking water no matter how long you soak the unit because this substance evaporates easily when heated up. 
  • Fluoride – This substance builds up on filters over time even though they can block 90% of fluoride in some cases. This accumulation usually happens during normal usage where the flow rate slows down significantly – which is why we recommend replacing your fridge filter every 6 months for peak performance and efficiency. 
  • Salt – This substance can also accumulate within the pores of filters over time, which is why we recommend you replace your fridge water filter every 6 months for peak performance and efficiency.

Clean Your Refrigerator Filter Regularly To Avoid Accumulation Of Waxy Deposits:

Waxes and other organic compounds may build up over time with regular use, so we recommend cleaning your refrigerator’s filter cartridge once a month with warm tap water and a clean cloth or brush to improve its flow rate and maintain good drinking water quality. You can even do it more frequently than this if need be based on how often you consume water from your unit.

Can You Clean And Reuse Refrigerator Water Filters?

NO! You should not clean and reuse filter cartridges unless absolutely necessary because the cleaning agent itself can cause irreparable damage to your refrigerator’s inner components. 

This includes natural enzymes, surfactants, salts, minerals or other organic compounds which are present in most household cleaners made for cleaning sinks, bathtubs or kitchen appliances – so please be careful when deciding how to clean your fridge filters.

Do Any Fridge Filters Remove Chloride? 

Chloride is not easily absorbed by fridge filters because it evaporates when heated up during the filtration process. This substance does not build up over time, which is why replacing your filter cartridge every 6 months for peak performance and drinking water quality is highly recommended in our experience. 

Where Is The Refrigerator Filter Located?

The refrigerator water filter cartridge is usually located in either the front or side of your appliance’s interior chamber. Inside the unit, it is usually found close to a gas valve tube extending from its cover for easy access – which may explain why you might find a slight chlorine odor in this area at times when your fridge’s running. 

As a general rule, your water filter should be removed and replaced every six months for peak performance and efficiency because even though it can remove up to 90% fluoride from tap water under normal conditions, this substance builds up inside its pores over time making it less effective with continued use – so please refer to your manufacturer’s booklet for replacement guidelines that apply to your particular model.  

Is There A Difference Between Refrigerator Water Filters?

No, all fridge water filters are made of the same type of media regardless of their color or shape – so there is no need to buy a matching model if your refrigerator fails to filter properly. They’re also interchangeable between different models from the same manufacturer as long as they have the same size and shape, which means you can use an LG filter in a unit for the sake of convenience depending on availability. 

However, it’s always best to buy your replacement water filters from the manufacturer of your appliance for quality control purposes. 

Do Any Fridge Water Filters Remove Chloride?

No, but this substance evaporates when heated up during the filtration process which is why a chlorine smell in your drinking water may occur from time to time if your cartridge is reaching its expiration date. This does not mean that your refrigerator filter is no longer capable of producing quality drinking water from your tap, so please continue using it until you receive a replacement model from us or the manufacturer. 

Do I Need A Separate Filter For My Icemaker And Water Dispenser?

No, because fridge filters are designed to work both as refrigerator water filter cartridges and ice maker water filters for your entire appliance at the same time. This means that you will only need to replace this part once every six months if it has been used in a household with 4-5 people on average, which is why we recommend checking your owner’s manual for more information on how often this needs replacing – or checking out our top-selling models here. 

As a general rule, your water filter should be removed and replaced every six months for peak performance and efficiency because even though it can remove up to 90% fluoride from tap water under normal conditions, this substance builds up inside its pores over time making it less effective with continued use – so please refer to your manufacturer’s booklet for replacement guidelines that apply to your particular model. 

Where Does The Filter Fit Into My Fridge?

Your refrigerator filter cartridge is usually located in the front of your appliance’s interior chamber, but some models may feature it in an internal compartment behind the water and ice dispenser instead. If you find that the fridge has no water dispense function but you still see a tube extending from its cover resembling a gas valve or chlorine tank, this means that you need to replace your filter with one designed for this type of refrigerator – which is also how we can help. 

To make sure that your unit is compatible with our replacement filters before placing an order, please refer to the manufacturer’s booklet (or call their customer service) to ensure that it fits into either side or front of your refrigerator depending on its model. 

Do Refrigerator Water Filters Remove Chlorine?

Although filters are not designed to remove chlorine from tap water, they can lower it to a certain degree over time. If your drinking water has an offensive smell of this substance coming from your dispenser or ice cubes because the cartridge is reaching its expiration date, please replace it with a new one for continued use – or check out our top-selling models here. 

As a general rule, your water filter should be removed and replaced every six months for peak performance and efficiency because even though it can remove up to 90% fluoride from tap water under normal conditions, this substance builds up inside its pores over time making it less effective with continued use – so please refer to your manufacturer’s booklet for replacement guidelines that apply to your particular model. 

How To Know My Refrigerator Water Is Compatible With My Fridge Model?

You can ask your fridge’s manufacturer for confirmation of this, but the best way to find out is by testing it yourself. You’ve probably already heard of chlorine test strips which are widely available at your local home supply store, so using one might seem like a good idea. However, these test strips only show if there is chlorine in the water and they don’t do much in terms of showing you how much or if any other contaminants are present in your tap water. As mentioned above, some refrigerators come with their own filtration system that filters out most chemicals and particulates from the water before reaching the internal tank. On top of that, refrigerator manufacturers perform rigorous tests on their products (including testing for chemical removal capabilities), therefore they’re the best source of information regarding this issue.

How Do I Know If My Refrigerator Water Filter Is Clogged?

 refrigerator filters are designed to remove up to 90% fluoride from your drinking water, but they can become clogged over time with continued use if it is not replaced in accordance with the manufacturer’s guidelines. This means that when you turn on your dispenser and nothing comes out, there isn’t anything left inside of your cartridge for it to function properly – which also indicates that it must be replaced ASAP! 

Can I Use My Fridge Without The Water Filter?

Although filters are designed to remove chlorine from drinking water if your unit does not have a dispenser system, they can also replace it with fluoride, which is an even more hazardous substance that builds up over time. To avoid this problem, we recommend replacing your filter at least every six months for optimal performance and efficiency.

Can An Old Refrigerator Water Filter Make You Sick?

Some customers have claimed that their drinking water tasted like metal after using replacement filters, but this is usually due to the fact that tap water is also treated with fluoride (and chlorine) which builds up over time. The good news is that if your unit has a dispenser system, you can simply use it as a source of fresh drinking water – or just swap out your cartridge for a new one every six months for optimal performance.

Many people do not realize that refrigerator filters contain antimicrobial protection for the life of your filter which can last up to six months or 400 gallons, whichever comes first. This means that you don’t have to worry about consuming untreated water because this cartridge protects against bacteria, algae, fungus and mold while also reducing chlorine taste & odor – so please check out our top-selling models here!

Do Refrigerator Water Filters Really Work?

 fridge filters are designed to remove up to 90% fluoride from your drinking water so that you can finally enjoy crystal clear, great tasting water for a longer period of time. This means that when you turn on your dispenser and nothing comes out, there isn’t anything left inside – which also indicates that it must be replaced ASAP! 

Do I Need To Change My Water Filter Cartridge Twice A Year?

All refrigerator water filters require replacement every six months under normal use for optimal performance and efficiency – but if you live in an area where the tap water contains a very high concentration of minerals or chemicals, or have a compromised immune system due to health conditions like diabetes, cancer or heart disease, you may need to replace it more often.

What Do Refrigerator Filters Filter Out?

 fridge filters are designed to reduce the following contaminants by up to 90%:

  • Lead – which can cause developmental disabilities and damage your organs & nervous system over time.
  • Particulates – which carry bacteria that can contaminate your drinking water.
  • Chlorine taste & odor – which gives tap water an unpleasant, chemical flavor that you cannot see.
  • Aluminum – which is a byproduct of industrial waste that has been linked to Alzheimer’s disease.
  • Mercury – which can cause brain and nervous system damage if consumed.
  • Bacteria, algae, fungus & mold – which can not only make you sick but also promote the growth of antibiotic-resistant superbugs like MRSA (Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus Aureus).

Is There A Filter That Fits All Refrigerator Brands?

Although filters are designed to fit most refrigerators, there are some brands that require specific replacement parts because of the unique way in which their water dispensers were manufactured. This is especially the case with GE appliances where you will need to purchase either a GE MWF or GSWF filter if your refrigerator has this type of system – otherwise, it will not work properly.

In addition to these brands, filters should not be combined with other water pitcher filter systems that have been designed specifically for refrigerators from companies like PURE and Kenmore. Although this is a convenient way to save money on replacement filters, it’s important to remember that the majority of these products were not designed for your refrigerator and may compromise how clean your water tastes and smells.

If you own any of the following appliances: GE (General Electric), Hotpoint, KitchenAid, RCA, Maytag, or Amana Refrigerator Water Filter – You will need a different type of cartridge.

How Long Do Refrigerator Water Filters Last?

 refrigerator water filters are designed to last for up to six months or 400 gallons, whichever comes first. This applies not just to us but also to your local water supplier because most companies now rely on this technology as their main source of contamination filtration.

What Problems Can A Fridge Filter Fix?

Most of the time, fridge filters are designed to fix two problems but can also create new ones if they’re not changed correctly. The first of these is the taste and smell of your drinking water – if it tastes or smells anything but ‘clean,’ then it may be time for a new filter.

The second problem you will run into without one is mold & bacterial growth on the walls inside your refrigerator’s water system. This is due to all types of contaminants being filtered out along with the minerals that promote its development, resulting in clean-tasting, germ-free water once it reaches your glass.

Refrigerator Water Filters vs Long-Lasting Reverse Osmosis Systems

If you decide to buy a fridge filter from companies like PureH2O or Aquagear instead of a long-lasting reverse osmosis system, expect to replace it at least once a year. The way in which these systems work is by purifying the water that enters your refrigerator – not the water that comes out of its dispenser. This means that contaminants are still being filtered when you pour yourself a glass, resulting in spotty glasses and oftentimes requiring two filters – one for drinking and another for filling up large pitchers.

Can I Recycle My Old Refrigerator Water Filters?

Yes, refrigerator water filters are recyclable. In fact, you can drop them off at any of the following locations:

  • Home Depot stores that have a recycling program
  • Lowes in participating locations (call your local store to confirm)
  • Whole Foods in selected areas (check with your local store)
  • Ace Hardware (no confirmation available online but check with your location before dropping off)

Are Refrigerator Water Filters Any Good?

Although refrigerator water filters can be effective in some cases, it’s important to realize that they are by no means a replacement for reverse osmosis and whole house filtration systems. These types of appliances (when used properly) will purify the entire household’s drinking and cooking water while also treating its wastewater, eliminating the need for any type of filter on each individual faucet.

This is especially true if your household consists of more than two people because their level of exposure to contaminants increases dramatically when filtered water isn’t readily available – think about having to get up every time you want a glass or fill up a pitcher for use throughout the day.

How To Recycle Refrigerator Water Filters?

You might be surprised, but recycling those refrigerator water filters is actually quite easy. You don’t need to put them in the trash and you also do not need to purchase new ones. Just follow these steps:

1- Cut the filter open like a butterfly (see picture).

2-Empty toxic elements into the trash or better yet, take them outside for disposal.

3- Rinse thoroughly with dishwashing soap and warm water.

4- Fill clean filter with cold tap water.

5- Add 2 tablespoons of chlorine bleach

6 -Agitate until all bleach has dissolved

7 -Keep bleached filter under running water while filling it with cold tap water

8 -Fill up to top

9 -Let stand overnight- Pour out any sediment left in the refrigerator water filter

10 -Stick it back into your refrigerator.

Conclusion

Every time you change your refrigerator water filter, you’re doing something to help the environment. It’s as simple as that. You may not know it, but by changing your fridge filters on a regular basis, you are actually saving more money than what you spend on new filters and having them installed in the first place! How is this possible? Well, let’s take a look at how much money we can save and why we should be changing our refrigerator water filters every six months or so.

Read more:

How To Make Alkaline Water?

Types Of Water Filter Systems

How To Clean Water Filter?

How To Install A Countertop Water Filter?

How To Change Gravity Water Filters?

How Do Water Filter Pitchers Work?

Zero Water Vs Brita: Which Is The Better Water Filtering Pitcher Brand?

Things You Must Know Before Buying Shower Water Filters

Brita Vs PUR: Which Is The Better Water Filter?

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